Wednesday, May 8, 2013

[Erouting] Lab 1.5.2: Basic Router Configuration Answer 100%



Learning Objectives
Upon completion of this lab, you will be able to:
• Cable a network according to the Topology Diagram.
• Erase the startup configuration and reload a router to the default state.
• Perform basic configuration tasks on a router.
• Configure and activate Ethernet interfaces.
• Test and verify configurations.
• Reflect upon and document the network implementation.
Scenario
(Instructor Note: Skip this lab if the student is required to complete Lab 1.5.1: Cabling a Network and
Basic Router Configuration.) In this lab activity, you will create a network that is similar to the one
shown in the Topology Diagram. Begin by cabling the network as shown in the Topology Diagram. You
will then perform the initial router configurations required for connectivity. Use the IP addresses that are
provided in the Topology Diagram to apply an addressing scheme to the network devices. When the
network configuration is complete, examine the routing tables to verify that the network is operating
properly. This lab is a shorter version of Lab 1.5.1: Cabling a Network and Basic Router Configuration
and assumes you are proficient in basic cabling and configuration file management.
Task 1: Cable the Network.
Cable a network that is similar to the one in the Topology Diagram. The output used in this lab is from
1841 routers. You can use any current router in your lab as long as it has the required interfaces as
shown in the topology. Be sure to use the appropriate type of Ethernet cable to connect from host to
switch, switch to router, and host to router. Refer to Lab 1.5.1: Cabling a Network and Basic Router
Configuration if you have any trouble connecting the devices. Be sure to connect the serial DCE cable to
router R1 and the serial DTE cable to router R2.
Answer the following questions:
What type of cable is used to connect the Ethernet interface on a host PC to the Ethernet interface on a
switch? ___________ Straight-through (Patch) cable_______________
What type of cable is used to connect the Ethernet interface on a switch to the Ethernet interface on a
router? ___________ Straight-through (Patch) cable_______________
What type of cable is used to connect the Ethernet interface on a router to the Ethernet interface on a
host PC? ___________Crossover cable________________________
Task 2: Erase and Reload the Routers.
Step 1: Establish a terminal session to router R1.
Refer to Lab 1.5.1, “Cabling a Network and Basic Router Configuration,” for review of terminal emulation
and connecting to a router.
Step 2: Enter privileged EXEC mode.

Router>enable
Router#
Step 3: Clear the configuration.
To clear the configuration, issue the erase startup-config command. Press Enter when prompted
to [confirm] that you really do want to erase the configuration currently stored in NVRAM.
Router#erase startup-config
Erasing the nvram filesystem will remove all files! Continue? [confirm]
[OK]
Erase of nvram: complete
Router#
Step 4: Reload configuration.
When the prompt returns, issue the reload command. Answer no if asked to save changes.
What would happen if you answered yes to the question, “System configuration has been
modified. Save?”
_______________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________
The current running configuration would be saved to NVRAM negating the whole purpose of erasing the
startup configuration. The router would bootup with a configuration.
The result should look something like this:
Router#reload

System configuration has been modified. Save? [yes/no]: no
Proceed with reload? [confirm]

Press Enter when prompted to [confirm] that you really do want to reload the router. After the router
finishes the boot process, choose not to use the AutoInstall facility, as shown:

Would you like to enter the initial configuration dialog? [yes/no]: no
Would you like to terminate autoinstall? [yes]: [Press Return]
Press Enter to accept default.
Press RETURN to get started!

Step 5: Repeat Steps 1 through 4 on router R2 to remove any startup configuration file that may
be present.
Task 3: Perform Basic Configuration of Router R1.
Step 1: Establish a HyperTerminal session to router R1.
Step 2: Enter privileged EXEC mode.
Router>enable
Router#
Step 3: Enter global configuration mode.
Router#configure terminal
Enter configuration commands, one per line.  End with CNTL/Z.
Router(config)#

Step 4: Configure the router name as R1.
Enter the command hostname R1 at the prompt.
Router(config)#hostname R1
R1(config)#

Step 5: Disable DNS lookup.
Disable DNS lookup with the no ip domain-lookup command.
R1(config)#no ip domain-lookup
R1(config)#

Why would you want to disable DNS lookup in a lab environment?
_______________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________
So that the router does not attempt to lookup up a DNS entry for a name that is really only a typing error.
What would happen if you disabled DNS lookup in a production environment?
_______________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________
A router would not be able to resolve names causing potential problems when the router needs an IP
address for to address a packet.

Step 6: Configure the EXEC mode password.
Configure the EXEC mode password using the enable secret password command. Use class for
the password.
R1(config)#enable secret class
R1(config)#

Why is it not necessary to use the enable password password command?
_______________________________________________________________________________
_______________________________________________________________________________
Although both passwords are listed in the configuration, the enable secret command overrides the
enable password command.
Step 7: Configure a message-of-the-day banner.
Configure a message-of-the-day banner using the banner motd command.
R1(config)#banner motd &
Enter TEXT message.  End with the character '&'.
********************************
  !!!AUTHORIZED ACCESS ONLY!!!
********************************
&
R1(config)#

When does this banner display?
_______________________________________________________________________________
When a user logins into the router either through telnet or the console connection.
Why should every router have a message-of-the-day banner?
_______________________________________________________________________________
To provide a warning to intentional or unintentional unauthorized access.
Step 8: Configure the console password on the router.
Use cisco as the password. When you are finished, exit from line configuration mode.
R1(config)#line console 0
R1(config-line)#password cisco
R1(config-line)#login
R1(config-line)#exit
R1(config)#

Step 9: Configure the password for the virtual terminal lines.
Use cisco as the password. When you are finished, exit from line configuration mode.
R1(config)#line vty 0 4
R1(config-line)#password cisco
R1(config-line)#login
R1(config-line)#exit
R1(config)#

Step 10: Configure the FastEthernet0/0 interface.
Configure the FastEthernet0/0 interface with the IP address 192.168.1.1/24.
R1(config)#interface fastethernet 0/0
R1(config-if)#ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0
R1(config-if)#no shutdown

%LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface FastEthernet0/0, changed state to up
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface FastEthernet0/0, changed
state to up
R1(config-if)#

Step 11: Configure the Serial0/0/0 interface.
Configure the Serial0/0/0 interface with the IP address 192.168.2.1/24. Set the clock rate to 64000.
Note: The purpose of the clock rate command is explained in Chapter 2: Static Routes.
R1(config-if)#interface serial 0/0/0
R1(config-if)#ip address 192.168.2.1 255.255.255.0
R1(config-if)#clock rate 64000
R1(config-if)#no shutdown
R1(config-if)#

Note: The interface will be activated until the serial interface on R2 is configured and activated
Step 12: Return to privileged EXEC mode.
Use the end command to return to privileged EXEC mode.
R1(config-if)#end
R1#
Step 13: Save the R1 configuration.
Save the R1 configuration using the copy running-config startup-config command.
R1#copy running-config startup-config
Building configuration...
[OK]
R1#

What is a shorter version of this command? _____copy run start______
Task 4: Perform Basic Configuration of Router R2.
Step 1: For R2, repeat Steps 1 through 9 from Task 3.
Step 2: Configure the Serial 0/0/0 interface.
Configure the Serial 0/0/0 interface with the IP address 192.168.2.2/24.
R2(config)#interface serial 0/0/0
R2(config-if)#ip address 192.168.2.2 255.255.255.0
R2(config-if)#no shutdown

%LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface Serial0/0/0, changed state to up
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface Serial0/0/0, changed state
to up
R2(config-if)#
Step 3: Configure the FastEthernet0/0 interface.
Configure the FastEthernet0/0 interface with the IP address 192.168.3.1/24.
R2(config-if)#interface fastethernet 0/0
R2(config-if)#ip address 192.168.3.1 255.255.255.0
R2(config-if)#no shutdown

%LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface FastEthernet0/0, changed state to up
%LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface FastEthernet0/0, changed
state to up
R2(config-if)#
Step 4: Return to privileged EXEC mode.
Use the end command to return to privileged EXEC mode.
R2(config-if)#end
R2#
Step 5: Save the R2 configuration.
Save the R2 configuration using the copy running-config startup-config command.
R2#copy running-config startup-config
Building configuration...
[OK]
R2#
Task 5: Configure IP Addressing on the Host PCs.
Step 1: Configure the host PC1.
Configure the host PC1 that is attached to R1 with an IP address of 192.168.1.10/24 and a default
gateway of 192.168.1.1.
Step 2: Configure the host PC2.
Configure the host PC2 that is attached to R2 with an IP address of 192.168.3.10/24 and a default
gateway of 192.168.3.1.
Task 6: Verify and Test the Configurations.
Step 1: Verify that routing tables have the following routes using the show ip route command.
The show ip route command and output will be thoroughly explored in upcoming chapters. For now,
you are interested in seeing that both R1 and R2 have two routes. Both routes are designated with a C.
These are the directly connected networks that were activated when you configured the interfaces on
each router. If you do not see two routes for each router as shown in the following output, proceed to Step
2.
R1#show ip route
Codes: C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
       D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
       N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
       E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
       i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
       ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
       o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route

Gateway of last resort is not set

C    192.168.1.0/24 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/0
C    192.168.2.0/24 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
R1#

R2#show ip route
Codes: C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
       D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area
       N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2
       E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
       i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2
       ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-user static route
       o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route

Gateway of last resort is not set

C    192.168.2.0/24 is directly connected, Serial0/0/0
C    192.168.3.0/24 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/0
R2#

Step 2: Verify interface configurations.
Another common problem is router interfaces that are not configured correctly or not activated. Use the
show ip interface brief command to quickly verify the configuration of each router’s interfaces.
Your output should look similar to the following:

R1#show ip interface brief
Interface            IP-Address      OK? Method Status                Protocol
FastEthernet0/0      192.168.1.1     YES manual up                    up
FastEthernet0/1      unassigned      YES unset  administratively down down
Serial0/0/0            192.168.2.1     YES manual up                    up
Serial0/0/1            unassigned      YES unset  administratively down down
Vlan1                  unassigned      YES manual administratively down down

R2#show ip interface brief
Interface            IP-Address      OK? Method Status                Protocol
FastEthernet0/0      192.168.3.1     YES manual up                    up
FastEthernet0/1      unassigned      YES unset  administratively down down
Serial0/0/0            192.168.2.2     YES manual up                    up
Serial0/0/1            unassigned      YES unset  down                  down
Vlan1                  unassigned      YES manual administratively down down

If both interfaces are up and up, then both routes will be in the routing table. Verify this again by using the
show ip route command.
Step 3: Test connectivity.
Test connectivity by pinging from each host to the default gateway that has been configured for that host.
From the host attached to R1, is it possible to ping the default gateway? _____Yes_____
From the host attached to R2, is it possible to ping the default gateway? _____Yes_____
If the answer is no for any of the above questions, troubleshoot the configurations to find the error using
the following systematic process:
1. Check the PCs.
Are they physically connected to the correct router? (Connection could be through a switch or
directly.) _____ Yes _____
Are link lights blinking on all relevant ports? _____ Yes _____
2. Check the PC configurations.
Do they match the Topology Diagram? _____ Yes _____
3. Check the router interfaces using the show ip interface brief command.
Are the interfaces up and up? _____ Yes _____
If your answer to all three steps is yes, then you should be able to successfully ping the default gateway.
Step 4: Test connectivity between router R1 and R2.
From the router R1, is it possible to ping R2 using the command ping 192.168.2.2? ____ Yes ____

From the router R2, is it possible to ping R1 using the command ping 192.168.2.1? ____ Yes ____

If the answer is no for the questions above, troubleshoot the configurations to find the error using the
following systematic process:
1. Check the cabling.
Are the routers physically connected? ____ Yes ____
Are link lights blinking on all relevant ports? ____ Yes ____
2. Check the router configurations.
Do they match the Topology Diagram? ____ Yes ____
Did you configure the clock rate command on the DCE side of the link? ____ Yes ____
3. Check the router interfaces using the show ip interface brief command.
Are the interfaces “up” and “up”? ____ Yes ____
If your answer to all three steps is yes, then you should be able to successfully ping from R2 to R1 and
from R2 to R3.
Task 7: Reflection
Step 1: Attempt to ping from the host connected to R1 to the host connected to R2.
This ping should be unsuccessful.
Step 2: Attempt to ping from the host connected to R1 to router R2.
This ping should be unsuccessful.  CCNA Exploration
Routing Protocols and Concepts:
Introduction to Routing and Packet Forwarding  Lab 1.5.2: Basic Router Configuration

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